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Southern snakes
Drysdalia - Worrell, 1961

Pronunciation: drys-DAY-lee-uh
 Etymology: "After Mr. G. Russell Drysdale, Australian artist who accompanied me to Tasmanian islands where I collected the material for this generic description."1

Taxonomic notes:

The western crowned snake (Elapognathus coronatus) was previously placed in this genus.

Notes:
Statistics: Reproductive modes:
Live-bearing - 3 out of 3 Australian species

Size range:
Smallest Australian species: mustard-bellied snake (Drysdalia rhodogaster) at 40 cm
 Longest Australian species: mustard-bellied snake (Drysdalia rhodogaster) at up to 40 cm
Number of Australian species: 3
 

white-lipped snake (Drysdalia coronoides)
Dunkeld, Victoria
Photo © Henry Cook
white-lipped snake (Drysdalia coronoides) distribution range map Drysdalia coronoides
White-lipped snake
Year described
(G√ľnther 1858)
Description
Colouration variable, ranging from olive-brown, grey, reddish brown, dark grey to black; belly variable. No pale or dark bands across the nape; a white stripe is present on the upper lip.

Masters' snake (Drysdalia mastersii)
Coffin Bay, South Australia
Photo © Rob Valentic
Masters' snake (Drysdalia mastersii) distribution range map Drysdalia mastersii
Masters' snake
Year described
(Krefft 1866)
Description
Light brown to dark grey above with a light, often broken, band across the nape; head darker than body; a white stripe is present on the upper lip extending back to neck.

mustard-bellied snake (Drysdalia rhodogaster)
Leura, New South Wales
Photo © Henry Cook
mustard-bellied snake (Drysdalia rhodogaster) distribution range map Drysdalia rhodogaster
Mustard-bellied snake
Year described
(Jan & Sordelli 1873)
Description
Brown to grey above, head darker, with a yellow to orange band across the nape. No white stripe on the upper lip, but occasionally a dark streak extending from the snout through the eye.

References
  1. Worrell, Eric (1961). Herpetological name changes. Western Australian Naturalist, 8(1):18-27.
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